Sunday, 19 February 2017

Anyone can get a better deal on a new car; here's how...


A car is a big expense, but no matter what the vehicle is, you don’t have to treat the asking price as gospel. The truth is that private sellers and dealerships can offer more wiggle room on a deal than they might initially suggest. Finding that wiggling room is what this piece is all about.

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Don’t let yourself get taken for a ride

The first thing to remember is that you need to buy with your head, not with your heart. Salespeople will use a lot of tricks to appeal to your sense getting good value, but you have to be able to say no to them. Think of the long-term value of the deal they mention, not just how flashy it appears.

Have your finances sorted first

Buying a car outright might seem like it will get you the best deal, but don’t be afraid of getting your car financed. Even if your credit isn’t great, auto loans bad credit deals can help you get your budget set in stone giving you firmer rules to negotiate in. However, you should also play it close to your chest. Without lying to them, let dealers believe you’re buying a car outright. It’s in financed deals that they tend to push more extras on you for their own commission.

Get thorough with the vehicle

Learn as much about the car and how it’s priced on the market in general. That can give you a realistic expectation of what you can work the asking price down to. You also want to make sure you’re getting a car fit to standard, especially if it’s used. Consider getting it valuated or, if you can’t get an inspection, learn how to give it a thorough test drive and what you should be looking for.

Get it in ink

Before you agree to any deal and even before you start haggling, get a quote on the deal as it stands. There are hidden costs of buying a car in fees and extras that aren’t always listed on the asking price. You won’t know how good a deal you’re getting until you know exactly what the final deal is going to be.

Think about the long-term costs

Similarly, a good deal can easily become a harder hitting purchase when you realize that the long-term costs, such as fuel, maintenance, and part replacements are much higher than you thought. There is a lot of detail online on how expensive cars are to run and which are a much more reliable option. Don’t get fooled by a car that looks like a great deal on the surface. Get a little deeper.

Remember, no matter whether you believe you can get a better deal or not, keep a civil tongue. Being standoffish and too aggressive with anyone selling a car is more likely to put them off you than land you a better price. This doesn’t mean you have to bend to their whims, but you shouldn’t make yourself too difficult to deal with, either.


** This is a collaborative post

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